A World Atlas of Translation

Intro -- A World Atlas of Translation -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Six consultants -- Identifying traditions -- Looking for translation -- A World Atlas of Translation -- Going through the steps -- References -- Chapter 1. Translating in the Pa...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Gambier, Yves
Contributors: Stecconi, Ubaldo (Other)
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
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Published: Amsterdam/Philadelphia John Benjamins Publishing Company 2019
Reviews:[Rezension von: A world atlas of translation] (2020) (Stine, Philip C., 1943 - )
Series/Journal:Benjamins Translation Library v.145
Benjamins translation library (BTL) Volume 145
Further subjects:B Translating and interpreting ; History
B Electronic books
B Language and culture
Online Access: Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Parallel Edition:Print version: Gambier, Yves: A World Atlas of Translation. - Amsterdam/Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2019. - 9789027202154
Description
Summary:Intro -- A World Atlas of Translation -- Editorial page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Six consultants -- Identifying traditions -- Looking for translation -- A World Atlas of Translation -- Going through the steps -- References -- Chapter 1. Translating in the Pacific: Rendering the Christian Bible in the islanders' tongues -- 1. Scope and terminology -- 2. Current linguistic landscape -- 3. How to say "Translate" in Pacific languages -- 4. Early linguistic interactions and translation activities -- 5. New focus of translation activities - the Christian Bible -- 6. Recapitulation of a century (1818-1918) of Bible translation activities -- 7. Translating the Christian Bible in the Pacific from 1918 to date -- 8. Linguistic challenges faced by Pacific translators -- 9. Conclusion: Looking forward to the future -- References -- Chapter 2. Recent tradition in Australia -- 1. Preamble -- 2. Overview -- 3. The development of the concept of Translation -- 4. Formalising translation -- 5. Accreditation and training -- 6. Translation in practice -- 7. What is the concept of Translation in Australia? -- 8. A notion of Translation? -- References -- Chapter 3. Japanese conceptualizations of 'translation' -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The impact of script: Translation as transposition and gloss reading -- 3. Languages as fluid entities -- 4. Introduction of European concepts of Translation -- 5. The premodern professional norm with Dutch -- 6. Translation as scholarly mining and interpretation -- 7. Vernacular renditions of Chinese works -- 8. Intralingual translations -- 9. Inter-register translations -- 10. Imitation as creativity -- 11. Micro-level amalgams -- 12. Translation as a two-stage process -- 13. Moving 'mainstream' -- 14. Collaborative and surrogate translating and translator (in)visibility
15. The allure of opacity -- 16. The scope of 'Translation' in Japan -- 17. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4. Contemporary scene of translation in China -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Sending-out, soft power, and translation as cultural exportation -- 3. Commercialization, market economics, and translation as language service -- 4. Unity, minority languages, and translation as accommodationist strategy -- 5. Conclusion: Three keywords -- References -- Chapter 5. From plagiarism to incense sticks: The making of self and the other in translation history in Thai -- 1. Introduction: Thainess and otherness -- 2. Plae, prae, plian and plaeng: Translation in an etymology of change and transformation -- 3. The Asian connections -- 4. The age of Westernization: Translation as modernization, and plagiarism -- 5. Burning incense sticks: The translator's fidelity and invisibility -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Funding information -- Chapter 6. More or less "translation": Landscapes of language and communication in India -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Main challenging issues -- 3. Multitudes of translation -- 4. Examining perceptions of linguistic difference in pre-modern India -- 5. Colonial India and the institutionalisation of translation -- 6. Living in translation: Twentieth century and thereafter -- 7. Towards a conclusion? -- References -- Chapter 7. The Persian tradition -- 1. Challenging issues -- 2. Method and approach -- 3. Copyright -- 4. The politics of culture -- 5. Multilingualism -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 8. The notion of translation in the Arab world: A critical developmental perspective -- Preamble -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A heavy historical heritage -- 2.1 The rise of the Arab Self -- 2.2 The surrender of the Arab Self -- 3. Desalinating the Arab Self -- 3.1 Translating revolution -- 3.2 Assessing the Arab Human Development
3.3 Reclaiming difference -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9. Traditions of translation in Hebrew culture -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Translation born of diglossia -- 2.1 The biblical period -- 2.2 The mishnaic and talmudic periods: Enter the translator -- 2.3 The Middle Ages -- 2.4 The haskala: Jewish Enlightenment -- 2.5 The center shifts to Eastern Europe -- 3. The non-diglossic era -- 3.1 Back to Eretz Israel -- 3.2 The State years: Normalization and institutionalization -- 3.3 Translated literature: Norms and repertoire -- 3.4 The rise of translation studies -- 4. Epilogue -- References -- Chapter 10. Altaic tradition: Turkey -- 1. Identifying translation in East Turkic -- 2. Identifying translation in West Turkic -- 3. Identifying translation in Ottoman lexicons -- 3.1 Terceme in dictionaries translated from Arabic -- 3.2 Terceme in Ottoman Turkish dictionaries -- 4. Translation in Ottoman literary discourse in the late nineteenth century -- 4.1 Metaphors about translation -- 4.2 Translation as "imitation" and "emulation" -- 4.3 Functions attributed to translation -- 4.4 Translation and progress -- 4.5 Translation and Ottoman moral values -- 5. Translation strategies in discourse -- 5.1 Bipartite strategy: As the "same" versus "free" -- 5.2 Tripartite strategy: "As the same", "sense-for-sense" and "expanded" -- 5.3 Quadripartite strategy: "Sense-for-sense", "imitation" and fidelity to "figures of speech" and "thoughts" -- 5.4 A mode of converting between genres: "Tying" and "loosing" -- 5.5 Translation as "summary", "commentary" and "explanation" -- 6. Problem of translatability, terminological correspondence and translator's quality -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11. Translation tradition throughout South African history -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Translation and cultural conversion -- 2.1 The mercantilist period
2.2 The missionary period -- 3. Translation and cultural elevation/construction -- 4. Translation and resistance -- 5. Translation, transformation and neo-liberalism -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12. Translation traditions in Angola -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Oral translation traditions -- 3. Churches as pioneering translation agencies -- 4. Translation in media, non-religious literature and school -- 5. Current trends in translation -- References -- Chapter 13. The culture(s) of translation in Russia -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The translation economy of Old Rus to the beginning of the eighteenth century -- 2.1 Translation and Kievan Rus -- 2.2 Translation in Muscovy -- 3. The long eighteenth century: 1676-1825 -- What got translated? -- Who translated? -- How texts were translated? -- 4. The mid-nineteenth century to the Bolshevik Revolution -- What gets translated? -- Who translated? -- How texts were translated? -- 5. The Soviet and Post-Soviet periods -- What got translated? -- Who translated? -- How things were translated and the birth of Translation theory -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 14. The concept of translation in Slavic cultures -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The terms for translation -- 3. Translation practices and concepts through history -- 3.1 Common origins -- 3.2 Reconstructing translation methods -- 3.3 Secular translation -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 15. The Greek-speaking tradition -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Translation types, language and translation policies -- 3. The conceptualization of translation across periods -- 3.1 Ancient times -- 3.2 16th-19th century -- 3.3 Modern period -- 4. Possible reasons for the shift of conceptualization -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 16. Latin/Romance tradition -- 1. Rome -- 2. From the Middle Ages to Classicism -- 3. Emergence of national traditions
4. From traductologie towards translation studies? -- References -- Chapter 17. Germanic tradition -- Preamble -- 1. Gothic beginnings -- 2. A Germanic tradition born? -- 3. Rise of the vernaculars -- 4. The matter of the North -- 5. The mother tongue movement -- 6. Printing the biblical blow -- 7. Imitating the classical -- 8. A look to the North -- 9. Back to classics -- 10. Concluding remarks -- References -- Chapter 18. Hispanic South America -- 1. Transition periods -- 2. General characterization of translation in Hispanic South America -- 3. Concepts -- 4. Views on translation in Hispanic South America -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 19. The history of translation in Brazil through the centuries: In search of a tradition -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The 16th century: The time of the Línguas, the "Tongues" -- the Jesuits and José de Anchieta -- translation - reduction -- 3. The 17th century: Military translation -- religious libraries -- the importance of the Línguas -- Jewish interpreters -- translation - appropriation -- 4. The 18th century: Translation and sedition -- the ban on printing -- Nogueira de Gama -- the expulsion of the Jesuits -- translation-revolution -- 5. The 19th century: The translation of scientific works, plagiarism -- literary, religious and children's books -- the institutionalism of translation -- 6. The 20th and 21st centuries: Monteiro Lobato -- translations from English -- the "Golden Age" of translation -- translation as a profession -- media translation -- Translation Studies -- translation - inclusion -- 7. Final remarks -- References -- Chapter 20. Translation in Central America and Mexico -- 1. Translation and "the languages of independence" -- 2. Translation and the languages of law -- 3. Translation and the multi-lettered republics -- References -- Appendix 1
Chapter 21. Translation and North America: A reframing
ISBN:9027262969