The autonomy theme in the Church dogmatics: Karl Barth and his critics

The problem of human freedom before God echoes through the conflicts of western theology since Augustine and Pelagius and has posed an acute question to theologians for the past 200 years. Karl Barth, perhaps the greatest Protestant theologian of the twentieth century, faced not only the question of...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Macken, John (Author)
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
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Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 1990.
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Barth, Karl 1886-1968, Die kirchliche Dogmatik / Autonomy / Ethics
B Barth, Karl 1886-1968, Die kirchliche Dogmatik / Autonomy / Ethics / Criticism
Further subjects:B Barth, Karl
B Autonomy (Psychology) Religious aspects Christianity History of doctrines, 20th century
B Barth, Karl 1886-1968 Kirchliche Dogmatik
B Autonomy (Psychology) Religious aspects Christianity History of doctrines 20th century
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Parallel Edition:Non-electronic
Print version: 9780521346269
Description
Summary:The problem of human freedom before God echoes through the conflicts of western theology since Augustine and Pelagius and has posed an acute question to theologians for the past 200 years. Karl Barth, perhaps the greatest Protestant theologian of the twentieth century, faced not only the question of autonomy but also the theological answers that liberals had attempted to provide to it. His dissatisfaction with their answers led him to start a theological counter-revolution, which was thought to adopt a negative answer to the question of autonomy. In this careful study Fater Macken shows that a major re-interpretation of Barth's thought in this regard took place since 1968, and that - far from being an opponent of human freedom in relation to God - Barth is now thought to have proposed a positive account of human autonomy as his theology developed. Dr Macken demonstrates that Barth was neither fundamentalist nor conservative, but a creative and original thinker. This notable book, written by a Roman Catholic theologian, provides a comprehensive and useful guide to the 'new wave' of German Barth interpretation.
The history of the term 'autonomy' -- Kant and the term 'autonomy' -- Fichte: the Ich as first principle of philosophy -- Autonomy opposed to theism? -- Autonomy in the Church Dogmatics -- The background: Barth's reaction against Liberal theology -- Autonomy, theonomy and heteronomy in the Prolegomena -- Autonomy in the doctrine of Election -- The doctrine of Creation: against rival concepts of autonomy -- The doctrine of Reconciliation: correspondence and distinction between God and man -- Nature as distinct from grace: the Lights of the World -- Autonomy and Baptism: the ethical subject distinct from God -- The autonomy theme in Barth criticism since 1950 -- Barth criticism before 1968: a negative balance - Wolfhart Pannenberg -- Barth's positive relationship to modern autonomy: Barth criticism since 1968 -- Autonomy and ontology: Eberhard Jüngel -- Conclusions -- Critical questions -- Autonomy in the Church Dogmatics
Item Description:Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 05 Oct 2015)
ISBN:0511520166
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511520167