Discipleship and family ties in Mark and Matthew

During the first two centuries CE there was a common awareness that familial tensions were generated by conversions to the Christian faith. Yet studies of Christian origins have so far paid little attention to the impact of the Christian movement upon attitudes to family ties and natural kinship. St...

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Bibliographic Details
Subtitles:Discipleship & Family Ties in Mark & Matthew
Main Author: Barton, Stephen C. 1952-
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
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Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 1994.
In:Year: 1994
Reviews:REVIEWS (1996) (Best, Ernest, 1917 - 2004)
Series/Journal:Society for New Testament Studies monograph series 80
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Mark / Disciple / Family
B Matthew / Disciple / Family
Further subjects:B Bible. Mark Criticism, interpretation, etc
B Christian life ; Biblical teaching
B Jesus Christ ; Views on families
B Bible. Matthew Criticism, interpretation, etc
B Jesus Christ Views on families
B Bible
B Bible ; Matthew ; Criticism, interpretation, etc
B Bible ; Mark ; Criticism, interpretation, etc
B Jesus Christ ; Family
B Jesus Christ
B Christian Life Biblical teaching
B Jesus Christ Family
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Parallel Edition:Non-electronic
Print version: 9780521465304
Description
Summary:During the first two centuries CE there was a common awareness that familial tensions were generated by conversions to the Christian faith. Yet studies of Christian origins have so far paid little attention to the impact of the Christian movement upon attitudes to family ties and natural kinship. Stephen C. Barton remedies this deficiency by means of a detailed study of the relevant passages in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. First, however, he examines the religious traditions of Judaism and the philosophical traditions of the Greco-Roman world, and shows that the tensions apparent within the Christian movement were by no means unique. In all three areas of thought and religious belief there is found the conviction that familial obligations may be transcended by some higher responsibility, to God, to Christ, or to the demands of philosophy. Mark and Matthew saw the Jesus-movement as offering a transcendent allegiance, which relativised family ties.
Preface -- List of abbreviations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The subordination of family ties in Judaism and in the Greco-Roman world of the first century -- 3. Discipleship and family ties in Mark -- 4. Discipleship and family ties in Matthew -- 5. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index of passages -- Index of authors
Item Description:Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 05 Oct 2015)
ISBN:0511554842
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511554841