Byzantines, Latins, and Turks in the eastern mediterranean world after 1150

The late medieval eastern Mediterranean, before its incorporation into the Ottoman Empire in the sixteenth century, presents a complex and fragmented picture. The Ayyubid and Mamluk sultanates held sway over Egypt and Syria, Asia Minor was divided between a number of Turkish emirates, the Aegean bet...

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Bibliographic Details
Other Authors: Harris, Jonathan 1961-
Format: Print Book
Language:English
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Published: Oxford Oxford Univ. Press 2012
Edition:1. ed., 1. impr
Series/Journal:Oxford studies in Byzantium
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Byzantine Empire / History
B Levant / History 1150-1517
Further subjects:B Collection of essays
B Conference program 2005 Oxford
B Mediterranean region History 476-1517
B Mediterranean region Civilization
Online Access: Autorenbiografie (Verlag)
Inhaltsbeschreibung
Inhaltsverzeichnis (Verlag)
Klappentext (Verlag)
Leseprobe
Verlagsangaben (Verlag)
Description
Summary:The late medieval eastern Mediterranean, before its incorporation into the Ottoman Empire in the sixteenth century, presents a complex and fragmented picture. The Ayyubid and Mamluk sultanates held sway over Egypt and Syria, Asia Minor was divided between a number of Turkish emirates, the Aegean between a host of small Latin states, and the Byzantine Empire was only a fragment of its former size. This collection of thirteen original articles, by both established and younger scholars, seeks to find common themes that unite this disparate world. Focusing on religious identity, cultural exchange, commercial networks, and the construction of political legitimacy among Christians and Muslims in the late Medieval eastern Mediterranean, they discuss and analyse the interaction between these religious cultures and trace processes of change and development within the individual societies
The late medieval eastern Mediterranean, before its incorporation into the Ottoman Empire in the sixteenth century, presents a complex and fragmented picture. The Ayyubid and Mamluk sultanates held sway over Egypt and Syria, Asia Minor was divided between a number of Turkish emirates, the Aegean between a host of small Latin states, and the Byzantine Empire was only a fragment of its former size. This collection of thirteen original articles, by both established and younger scholars, seeks to find common themes that unite this disparate world. Focusing on religious identity, cultural exchange, commercial networks, and the construction of political legitimacy among Christians and Muslims in the late Medieval eastern Mediterranean, they discuss and analyse the interaction between these religious cultures and trace processes of change and development within the individual societies
Item Description:Formerly CIP Uk. - Includes bibliographical references and index
ISBN:0199641889