The Song of Songs and the Eros of God: a study in biblical intertextuality

"Modern biblical scholarship interprets the Song as a collection of love lyrics. For Edmée Kingsmill, on the contrary, the essence of the Song is mystical. A principal concern of this study, however, is to uncover the relationship between the 117 verses of the Song and those biblical books to w...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Kingsmill, Edmée 1930-
Format: Print Book
Language:English
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Published: Oxford [u.a.] Oxford University Press 2009
Reviews:Kingsmill, Edmée, The Song of Songs and the eros of God (2013) (James, Elaine T., 1980 - )
Series/Journal:Oxford theological monographs
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Song of Songs / Eroticism / Metaphor / God / Love
B Song of Songs / Intertextuality
Further subjects:B God Love
B Love Biblical teaching
B Bible Song of Solomon Criticism, interpretation, etc
B Bible O.T Song of Songs Criticism, interpretation, etc
Online Access: Inhaltsverzeichnis (Verlag)
Klappentext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:"Modern biblical scholarship interprets the Song as a collection of love lyrics. For Edmée Kingsmill, on the contrary, the essence of the Song is mystical. A principal concern of this study, however, is to uncover the relationship between the 117 verses of the Song and those biblical books to which they point. Beneath the metaphors a network of allusions is being woven, conveying a picture opposite to the one we find in the prophets who, confronted with the continual 'adultery' of Israel, poured forth their condemnations with unwearying passion. In dramatic contrast, the Song presents a paradisal picture (SoS 2:11-12). Thus, in presenting the ideal, the intention of the Song's author is shown to be encouragement. The inclusion of this poem in the biblical canon is understood, therefore, to be central to the purpose of the biblical literature: to bring all people to love the God of love. The book is in two parts. The first and longer part is concerned with themes, including the relationship of the Song to the early Jewish mystical literature. The second part is a short commentary intended for the reader interested in the text as much as in the related questions to which the text gives rise."--Publisher
"Modern biblical scholarship interprets the Song as a collection of love lyrics. For Edmée Kingsmill, on the contrary, the essence of the Song is mystical. A principal concern of this study, however, is to uncover the relationship between the 117 verses of the Song and those biblical books to which they point. Beneath the metaphors a network of allusions is being woven, conveying a picture opposite to the one we find in the prophets who, confronted with the continual 'adultery' of Israel, poured forth their condemnations with unwearying passion. In dramatic contrast, the Song presents a paradisal picture (SoS 2:11-12). Thus, in presenting the ideal, the intention of the Song's author is shown to be encouragement. The inclusion of this poem in the biblical canon is understood, therefore, to be central to the purpose of the biblical literature: to bring all people to love the God of love. The book is in two parts. The first and longer part is concerned with themes, including the relationship of the Song to the early Jewish mystical literature. The second part is a short commentary intended for the reader interested in the text as much as in the related questions to which the text gives rise."--Publisher
Item Description:Formerly CIP Uk. - Includes bibliographical references and index
ISBN:0199577242