New religions as global cultures: making the human sacred

"Although the Great Anti-Cult Crusade links new religious movements to dangerous cults, brainwashing, and the need for deprogramming, Karla Poewe and Irving Hexham argue that many cults are the product of a dynamic interaction between folk religions and the teachings of traditional world religi...

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Bibliographic Details
Authors: Hexham, Irving 1943- ; Poewe, Karla
Contributors: Poewe, Karla O. ca. 20. Jh. (Other)
Format: Print Book
Language:English
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Published: Boulder, Colo. Westview Press 1997
In:Year: 1997
Series/Journal:Explorations
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B New religion
Further subjects:B Cults History 20th century
B Sects
B Religion and sociology
B Religion and culture
B Religion and culture History 20th century
B Cults History Sources
B Cults Study and teaching History 20th century
B Anti-cult Movements History 20th century
B Cults
B Sects History Sources
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Summary:"Although the Great Anti-Cult Crusade links new religious movements to dangerous cults, brainwashing, and the need for deprogramming, Karla Poewe and Irving Hexham argue that many cults are the product of a dynamic interaction between folk religions and the teachings of traditional world religions. Drawing on examples from Africa, the United States, Asia, and Europe, they suggest that few new religions are really new. Most draw on rich, if localized, cultural traditions that are shaped anew by the influence of technological change and international linkages."--BOOK JACKET
"Although the Great Anti-Cult Crusade links new religious movements to dangerous cults, brainwashing, and the need for deprogramming, Karla Poewe and Irving Hexham argue that many cults are the product of a dynamic interaction between folk religions and the teachings of traditional world religions. Drawing on examples from Africa, the United States, Asia, and Europe, they suggest that few new religions are really new. Most draw on rich, if localized, cultural traditions that are shaped anew by the influence of technological change and international linkages."--BOOK JACKET
Item Description:Includes bibliographical references (S. 169-186) and index
ISBN:0813325072