Vessels of Wrath and God’s Pathos: Potter/Clay Imagery in Rom 9:20–23

Starting from the concept of divine patience in Rom 9:22, this article argues that Paul employs the potter/clay metaphor not (as often interpreted) to defend God’s right to arbitrary choice but rather as an appeal to what Abraham Heschel called divine pathos—the idea that God’s choices are impacted...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Harvard theological review
Main Author: Staples, Jason A. 1982-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Cambridge Univ. Press 2022
In: Harvard theological review
Year: 2022, Volume: 115, Issue: 2, Pages: 197-218
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Bible. Römerbrief 9,20-23 / Potter / God / Pathos
IxTheo Classification:HC New Testament
NBC Doctrine of God
Further subjects:B Sovereignty
B Clay
B Apostle Paul
B Theodicy
B Potter
B Predestination
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Summary:Starting from the concept of divine patience in Rom 9:22, this article argues that Paul employs the potter/clay metaphor not (as often interpreted) to defend God’s right to arbitrary choice but rather as an appeal to what Abraham Heschel called divine pathos—the idea that God’s choices are impacted by human actions. The potter/clay imagery in Rom 9:20-23 thus serves to highlight the dynamic and improvisational way the God of Israel interacts with Israel and, by extension, all of creation.
ISSN:1475-4517
Contains:Enthalten in: Harvard theological review
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1017/S0017816022000116