Making Patristics pertinent: theological echoes and anticipations from John Henry Newman’s 1833 Mediterranean tour

Beyond the bare facts, little is popularly known about John Henry Newman’s 1833 Mediterranean tour. While Newman’s biographers describe his journey in lively detail, common knowledge is generally limited to three facts. Firstly, beginning in December of 1832, Newman spent seven months travelling acr...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Melita theologica
Main Author: Carola, Joseph 1962-
Format: Print Article
Language:English
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Published: 2019
In: Melita theologica
Year: 2019, Volume: 69, Issue: 2, Pages: 127-151
IxTheo Classification:KAB Church history 30-500; early Christianity
KAH Church history 1648-1913; modern history
KBA Western Europe
KDB Roman Catholic Church
Further subjects:B Newman, John Henry, 1801-1890 -- Criticism and appreciation
B Fathers of the church
B Newman, John Henry, 1801-1890 -- Influence
B Newman, John Henry, 1801-1890 -- Travel -- Malta
Description
Summary:Beyond the bare facts, little is popularly known about John Henry Newman’s 1833 Mediterranean tour. While Newman’s biographers describe his journey in lively detail, common knowledge is generally limited to three facts. Firstly, beginning in December of 1832, Newman spent seven months travelling across the Mediterranean Sea. Secondly, during the last leg of his journey, he fell gravely ill with typhoid fever in Sicily, and, thirdly, while sailing to Marseilles en route back to England, he composed his famous poem The Pillar of the Cloud better known by its opening line “Lead, Kindly Light.” The Maltese may themselves be mindful of the unpleasant month that Newman spent in Malta where, at first, he was quarantined for twelve days in the Lazaretto and then afterwards confined to his hotel room for close to a week on account of a severe cough brought on by the cold night air. Thus, initially quarantined and confined, Newman had only a few days remaining in order to see the sights before he departed for Sicily and the Italian peninsula. In his Apologia Pro Vita Sua, Newman himself dedicates only three pages to those seven months in southern Europe.2 In those pages, his chief concern is to demonstrate, firstly, what little contact he had with Catholics while abroad and, secondly, how attentively he followed political and ecclesiastical events then unfolding in England. The latter convinced him, that upon his return to England, he had a work to do. In contrast to the Apologia, however, Newman’s Letters and Diaries offer abundant information about his Mediterranean tour.
ISSN:1012-9588
Contains:Enthalten in: Melita theologica