New Religions and Lifelong Learning in Taiwan: The I Ching University of Weixin Shengjiao

In the past three decades, more and more students have enrolled in lifelong learning institutions operated by religious non-profit organizations in Taiwan. Under the conditions of lifelong learning policies, laws, and regulations, the types and courses of these ins...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:The journal of CESNUR
Main Author: Chang, Jimmy Ching-Ming (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2019]
In:The journal of CESNUR
Year: 2019, Volume: 3, Issue: 6, Pages: 48-58
Further subjects:B Non-profit Organizations in Taiwan
B I Ching University
B Lifelong Learning
B New Religions in Taiwan
B Weixin Shengjiao
Online Access: Volltext (Kostenfrei)
Description
Summary:In the past three decades, more and more students have enrolled in lifelong learning institutions operated by religious non-profit organizations in Taiwan. Under the conditions of lifelong learning policies, laws, and regulations, the types and courses of these institutions have become more and more diversified. The management of the organizations, the development strategies, and the quality of the organizations are different, calling for individualized case studies and in-depth research. The paper focuses on a pioneer lifelong learning institution, I Ching University, created by Taiwanese new religion Weixin Shengjiao. Its unique development model of the lifelong education system has been examined by using interviews and observation methods to collect qualitative data. The I Ching University has successfully applied five basic principles of lifelong learning: (1) the long-term talent training model; (2) access to learning regardless of age; (3) a curriculum oriented towards the practical needs of life; (4) a certification system; and (5) a self-built teacher training system. However, the research suggests, the effectiveness of lifelong learning at I Ching University may be improved by (1) applying for non-formal learning accreditation; (2) performing a satisfaction survey on learning, followed by informal discussions; (3) implementing a self-evaluation mechanism; and (4) establishing a process to evaluate learning effectiveness.
ISSN:2532-2990
Contains:Enthalten in: The journal of CESNUR
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.26338/tjoc.2019.3.6.4