Embodying the ‘'truth' and controlling change: '‘discipline' and ‘'choice' in ‘'orthodox' (‘'fundamentalist') reformed beliefs and practices in the Netherlands

The article examines the nature of ‘orthodox' or ‘fundamentalist' beliefs and practices in the Netherlands. It concentrates on Reformed Protestants. ‘Fundamentalist' religion has been seen as a reaction against the global changes initiated in the ‘modern' world. It is seen as rev...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of contemporary religion
Main Author: Watling, Tony (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2003]
In:Journal of contemporary religion
Year: 2003, Volume: 18, Issue: 3, Pages: 385-401
Online Access: Resolving-System
Description
Summary:The article examines the nature of ‘orthodox' or ‘fundamentalist' beliefs and practices in the Netherlands. It concentrates on Reformed Protestants. ‘Fundamentalist' religion has been seen as a reaction against the global changes initiated in the ‘modern' world. It is seen as reverting to ‘traditional' beliefs creating isolated communities that ‘discipline' individuals and seek to create certainty, as opposed to ‘liberal' religious beliefs or ‘secular' beliefs which stress individual choice, acknowledge more ‘fluid' and less ‘certain' boundaries, and encourage diversity and ecumenism. However, the ‘fundamentalist' form of religion may not merely be ‘traditional' and static; it can be as diverse, ‘modern', and adaptable as ‘liberalism' or ‘secularism'. The thrust of the article is, therefore, that this type of religion, what I designate as ‘orthodox' Reformed beliefs and practices, does provide, in the Netherlands, an arena for believers to experience community and some ‘certainty'—it ‘disciplines' individuals to ‘embody truths'—but it also encourages individual activism by emphasising reflexivity—a rational thought process—encouraging individuals to choose their religious (and secular) path thoughtfully. There is a dialectical interaction between individual and community, ‘choice' and ‘discipline'. The article argues that ‘orthodox' Reformed beliefs and practices may allow change in a controlled way.
ISSN:1469-9419
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of contemporary religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/13537900310001601721