Class and power in Roman Palestine: the socioeconomic setting of Judaism and Christian origins

Anthony Keddie investigates the changing dynamics of class and power at a critical place and time in the history of Judaism and Christianity - Palestine during its earliest phases of incorporation into the Roman Empire (63 BCE-70 CE). He identifies institutions pertaining to civic administration, ta...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Keddie, Anthony
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2019
Reviews:[Rezension von: Keddie, Anthony, ca. 20./21. Jh., Class and power in Roman Palestine] (2020) (Hezser, Catherine, 1960 - )
Further subjects:B Christians ; Social life and customs ; To 70 A.D
B Jews ; Social life and customs ; To 70 A.D
B Palestine ; Social life and customs ; To 70 A.D
B Palestine ; Social conditions ; To 70 A.D
Online Access: Resolving-System
Presumably Free Access
Parallel Edition:Erscheint auch als: 9781108493949
Description
Summary:Anthony Keddie investigates the changing dynamics of class and power at a critical place and time in the history of Judaism and Christianity - Palestine during its earliest phases of incorporation into the Roman Empire (63 BCE-70 CE). He identifies institutions pertaining to civic administration, taxation, agricultural tenancy, and the Jerusalem Temple as sources of an unequal distribution of economic, political, and ideological power. Through careful analysis of a wide range of literary, documentary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence, including the most recent discoveries, Keddie complicates conventional understandings of class relations as either antagonistic or harmonious. He demonstrates how elites facilitated institutional changes that repositioned non-elites within new, and sometimes more precarious, relations with privileged classes, but did not typically worsen their economic conditions. These socioeconomic shifts did, however, instigate changing class dispositions. Judaean elites and non-elites increasingly distinguished themselves from the other, through material culture such as tableware, clothing, and tombs.
Item Description:Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 11 Oct 2019)
ISBN:1108656757
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1017/9781108656757