Native American Pentecost: praxis, contextualization, transformation

PART ONE. DEVELOPING THE STUDY -- Chapter 1. Diverse voices: literature review and background -- Chapter 2. Methodology -- PART TWO. CEREMONIALISM: ITS PRACTICE AND MEANING -- Chapter 3. Practices that reveal Native American beliefs and values -- Chapter 4. Theological reflections in the light of co...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Other Authors: Alexander, Corky (Other)
Format: Print Book
Language:English
Subito Delivery Service: Order now.
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Published: Cleveland, Tenn. Cherohala Press c 2012
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B North America / Indians / Nature religion / Religious practice / Inculturation / Pentecostal churches / Contextual theology
B North America / Indians / Mission (international law / Church or God
Further subjects:B Pentecostalism North America
B Church of God (Cleveland, Tenn.) Missions
B Indians of North America Missions
B Indians of North America Religion
Online Access: Inhaltsverzeichnis (Verlag)
Klappentext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:PART ONE. DEVELOPING THE STUDY -- Chapter 1. Diverse voices: literature review and background -- Chapter 2. Methodology -- PART TWO. CEREMONIALISM: ITS PRACTICE AND MEANING -- Chapter 3. Practices that reveal Native American beliefs and values -- Chapter 4. Theological reflections in the light of contextualization theory -- Chapter 5. Relevance of Native American practices for contextualized behavior in Pentecostal churches -- Chapter 6. Conclusions and recommendations
"This important study examines the significance of traditional Native American practices in Pentecostal worship and observes how members of the Native American Contextual Movement integrate these practices. Alexander suggests missiological implications of traditional Native American practices in Pentecostal worship and church life. He addresses the development of the powwow movement and pan-Indianism as an important sociological phenomena paving the way for inter-tribal ministry. He surveys the history of Native American ministries in the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) and traces the development of a pneumatological Pentecostal theology of religions and the use of sacred objects in Pentecostalism. By using participant observation, personal interviews, and case studies, Alexander investigates examples of active contextualization and discovers how contextualized traditional practices enhance Native Pentecostal worship and mission. The study focuses on six traditional practices that are being contextualized in Native Pentecostal churches: language, smudging, drums and rattles, dance, talking circles, and ceremony. Alexander argues that implementing these contextualized practices in Pentecostal worship reduces syncretism and moves people closer to God."--Publisher's description
Item Description:Includes bibliographical references (p. [153]-158) and index
ISBN:1935931245