The aesthetic dimension of believing and learning

There is a common stereotype that in religious education (RE) classes, students surprisingly often study paintings or paint pictures, analyse poems or write creative texts, sing or do handcrafts, etc. There is something about these educational methods that seems to make (notably Catholic) RE differe...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Global Perspectives on Catholic Religious Education in Schools
Main Author: Altmeyer, Stefan 1976-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Published: 2015
In:Global Perspectives on Catholic Religious Education in Schools
Year: 2015, Pages: 61-72
Online Access: Volltext
Volltext
Volltext
Description
Summary:There is a common stereotype that in religious education (RE) classes, students surprisingly often study paintings or paint pictures, analyse poems or write creative texts, sing or do handcrafts, etc. There is something about these educational methods that seems to make (notably Catholic) RE different from other subjects. The question is whether this difference is more than a stereotype and instead could be understood as a trademark of RE. This paper aims to argue that the key to this question lies in the so-called aesthetic dimension of believing and learning. Correlating theological and educational perspectives, this chapter first provides an appropriate definition of aesthetics as reflecting about sensually mediated receptive and productive human actions of cognition. Second, it justifies aesthetic actions (like singing, writing, meditating, talking about paintings, etc.) as essential building blocks of being religious and learning about, respectively from religion. Finally, it proposes two elementary educational guidelines for designing and implementing aesthetic learning processes in RE.
ISBN:3319209256
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-20925-8_6
DOI: 10.15496/publikation-32313
HDL: 10900/90932