Banqueting in a Northern Arabian Oasis: A Nabataean Triclinium at Dûmat al-Jandal, Saudi Arabia

A large U-shaped building made of stones discovered in 2011 at the top of a promontory in Dümat al-Jandal (modern Dumat, Saudi Arabia) is interpreted as a vast freestanding open-air Nabataean triclinium. Radiocarbon dating and pottery readings set the main occupation of this triclinium during a rela...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
Main Authors: Charloux, Guillaume 1976-; Durand, Caroline (Author); Thomas, Ariane 1983-; Bouchaud, Charlène (Author); Monchot, Hervé (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2016]
In:Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
Year: 2016, Issue: 375, Pages: 13-34
Further subjects:B POTTERY
B RADIOCARBON dating
B fauna
B flora
B radiocarbon datings
B Ritual meal
B NABATAEANS
B Saudi Arabia
B DINNERS & dining
B pottery
B Nabataean period
B Arabia
B Triclinium
B Dumat
B Interdisciplinary research
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:A large U-shaped building made of stones discovered in 2011 at the top of a promontory in Dümat al-Jandal (modern Dumat, Saudi Arabia) is interpreted as a vast freestanding open-air Nabataean triclinium. Radiocarbon dating and pottery readings set the main occupation of this triclinium during a relatively short period, between the late first century b.c. and the late first century/early second century a.d. Excavation of the structure reveals pottery dishes and fireplaces regularly distributed throughout the occupation surface. Multidisciplinary studies of the archaeological material (pottery, bone, and plant remains) provide an opportunity to focus on the activities carried out within this type of cultic structure. By comparing the data with that of other studies undertaken in similar Nabataean triclinia found in Petra, Jordan, and Hegra, Saudi Arabia, in particular, this article seeks to give new insights into the question of "ritual meals". Moreover, this discovery of a first typical Nabataean building in Dümat al-Jandal confirms Nabataean control over trade routes north of the Arabian Peninsula at the turn of the Christian era.
ISSN:2161-8062
Contains:Enthalten in: American Schools of Oriental Research, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.5615/bullamerschoorie.375.0013