Beyond Intentionality: On the Non-dual Contemplative Practices of the Tibetan Buddhist Tradition "The Great Perfection"

The Buddhist vision of liberation is intimately related with an experiential state that transcends intentionality, temporality and causality, owing to its non-directed, unchanging and unconditioned nature. As such, this vision reveals a novel mode of non-dual awareness, which is not divided into per...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Contemporary buddhism
Main Author: Laish, Eran
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Routledge [2017]
In: Contemporary buddhism
Year: 2017, Volume: 18, Issue: 2, Pages: 364-384
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:The Buddhist vision of liberation is intimately related with an experiential state that transcends intentionality, temporality and causality, owing to its non-directed, unchanging and unconditioned nature. As such, this vision reveals a novel mode of non-dual awareness, which is not divided into perceiving subject and perceived objects. In order to directly recognise this mode, several Buddhist traditions utilised diverse contemplative instructions that were meant to dissolve the intending tendencies of consciousness. This paper discusses one of these traditions - "The Great Perfection" (Tib. rDzogs pa chen po) - which affirms an inherent experiential state that is open, luminous and all-encompassing. For the sake of realising such a state, this tradition advocates a contemplative approach which emphasises relaxation, spaciousness and non-intending. Through its view and practices, "The Great Perfection" introduces a vision of lived experience that goes beyond the structures of intentional consciousness and entails a reassessment of our basic assumptions about human awareness.
ISSN:1476-7953
Contains:Enthalten in: Contemporary buddhism
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/14639947.2017.1332500