Luther, learning, and the liberal arts

The learning goals of a well-designed course in the liberal arts include not only the imparting of knowledge but also the development of critical thinking and disciplinary expertise. A class on Luther can help students acquire those intellectual skills associated with the discipline of history and t...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Teaching theology and religion
Main Author: Burnett, Amy Nelson 1957-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2017]
In:Teaching theology and religion
Year: 2017, Volume: 20, Issue: 4, Pages: 296-303
Further subjects:B critical thinking
B scaffolding
B disciplinary expertise
B Martin Luther
B 95 theses
B learning
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:The learning goals of a well-designed course in the liberal arts include not only the imparting of knowledge but also the development of critical thinking and disciplinary expertise. A class on Luther can help students acquire those intellectual skills associated with the discipline of history and the liberal arts more generally as they consider broader questions about institutional religion, spirituality, moral choices, and human agency. Current scholarship on how people learn highlights the importance of adequate mental frameworks for the acquisition, retention, and retrieval of new ideas and information. This scholarship underlies the choice of specific strategies used to teach about Luther and the Reformation. Assignments provide "scaffolding," which begins with modeling and then moves from simpler to more complex assignments. Students practice the specific intellectual skills of critical reading and textual analysis over the course of the semester.
ISSN:1467-9647
Contains:Enthalten in: Teaching theology and religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1111/teth.12401