The Noborder Movement: Interpersonal Struggle with Political Ideals

Over the last decade, self-organized refugee protests in Europe have increased. One strand of activism in Europe, noborder, involves a transnational network of people who are heterogeneous with regards to legal status, race, or individual history of migration, but who share decolonial, anti-capitali...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Social Inclusion
Main Author: Gauditz, Leslie
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Cogitatio Press 2017
[publisher not identified]
In: Social Inclusion
Year: 2017, Volume: 5, Issue: 3, Pages: 49-57
Further subjects:B Activism
B prefiguration
B Protest
B self-organization
B everyday politics
B Asylum
B refugee protest
B Social Movements
B noborder
Online Access: Volltext (kostenfrei)
Description
Summary:Over the last decade, self-organized refugee protests in Europe have increased. One strand of activism in Europe, noborder, involves a transnational network of people who are heterogeneous with regards to legal status, race, or individual history of migration, but who share decolonial, anti-capitalist ideals that criticize the nation-state. Noborder activists embrace prefigurative strategies, which means enacting political ideals in their everyday life. This is why this article asks: How do noborder activists try to meet their political ideals in their everyday practices, and what effects do these intentions entail? Noborder practices take place at the intersection of self-organization as a reference to migrants’ legal status or identity, on the one hand, and self-organization as anti-hierarchical forms of anarchist-autonomous organization, on the other. On the basis of empirical findings of a multi-sited ethnography in Germany and Greece, this article conceptualizes that noborder creates a unique space for activists to meet in which people try to work productively through conflicts they see as being produced by a global system of inequalities. This demanding endeavor involves social pressure to self-reflect and to transform interpersonal relationships. Broader society could learn from such experiences to build more inclusive, heterogeneous communities.
ISSN:2183-2803
Contains:Enthalten in: Social Inclusion