Warum mußte Jesus leiden?: eine neue Konzeption der Soteriologie

All classical soteriological theories depend on Anselm's satisfaction theory. This theory, however cannot convince: 1. It destroys the gratuity of divine pardon. 2. It requires an impossibility, viz. the restitution of absolute innocence. 3. It does not preserve the unique efficiency of grace....

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Zeitschrift für katholische Theologie
Main Author: Schöndorf, Harald 1944-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:German
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Published: Echter 2002
In:Zeitschrift für katholische Theologie
Year: 2002, Volume: 124, Issue: 4, Pages: 440-467
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Anselm, Canterbury, Erzbischof, Heiliger 1033-1109, Cur Deus homo / Jesus Christus / Atoning death / Einheitsübersetzung der Heiligen Schrift. Matthäusevangelium 6,12 / Forgiveness of sins
Further subjects:B Theology
B Christology
B Grace / Redemption
B Aussöhnung / Reconciliation
B Reconciliation
B redemption / grace
B Suffering
B Leiden
B sin / justification
B Sin / Justification
Online Access: Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Parallel Edition:Non-electronic
Description
Summary:All classical soteriological theories depend on Anselm's satisfaction theory. This theory, however cannot convince: 1. It destroys the gratuity of divine pardon. 2. It requires an impossibility, viz. the restitution of absolute innocence. 3. It does not preserve the unique efficiency of grace. Neither can the solidarity theories convince: redemption is neither mere compassion nor a kind of non-violent resistance. We thus need a new conception of soteriology. The demand of pardon of the "Our Father" gives us a hint: An authentic pardon is only possible by him who experiences the consequences of the sin. These ultimately are destruction and death. In his divinity, God cannot suffer these effects of sin, because he is inviolable. So, he cannot really forgive sins. Moreover, how can he forgive the misdeeds committed against other people if he himself is not really affected by them? Therefore God "must" become man and suffer passion and death in order to be able to forgive us our sins. This conception avoids all difficulties of the hitherto existing soteriological theories and is compatible with all biblical and traditional statements about expiation, sacrifice etc.
Contains:Enthalten in: Zeitschrift für katholische Theologie